Effective Reading and Spelling program for Dyslexia Multisensory Reading Clinic Dyslexia Therapeutic Tutoring, Ruth Tougas, Effective Literacy Instruction for dyslexia, Dyslexia Reading success, Success Reading instruction for dyslexia Orton Gillingham -Multisensory Reading Clinic

Early Alphabetic Reading and Writing

 and Teaching the Sounds of the English Language for Reading Success

What is Early Alphabetic Reading and Writing?

 

Early alphabetic reading and writing is the second stage of learning to read and write. Usually, around five to six years old and so, this is the stage where the children become aware that words are made up of sounds. They begin to read and spell by sounding out words. When they see the print, they are using their knowledge of the sounds that they have heard to figure out how to read words and when they spell they put in writing the sounds that they have heard and from their reading experience such as the sample of one of our children's message below. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Mommy and Daddy, let us play electronics at 8:00"

Early Alphabetic Reading and Writing

 

The English language is based on sounds that represent the language at the elemental level and words in English are comprised of sounds and the children are starting to learn the sounds in kindergarten and grade one level. Hence, when we teach them the sounds, we need to teach them properly and accurately because sounds are critical for reading success.  They are the foundation for learning to read, write, spell and comprehend.

Teaching them the wrong sounds means we are giving them the wrong instruction which is the start of the reading failure while teaching them the correct sounds is the beginning of the reading success.

Tips for Teaching the Sounds of the English Language

 Do not teach the students "ma says /ma/ as in man." Or whatever keywords you would like to use. That is less effective and that is wrong! Also, do not teach the sound of the letter m as "ma" which is also wrong - meaning do not add "a" to the sound of the letter m.

The same as the letter n, do not teach your students "na says /na/  as in Nancy." or whatever keywords you would like to use. This is less effective. The sound of the letter n does not have a with it, therefore do NOT add a to the sound of the letter n, like na.

Also, of all the English language sounds, the letter 'r' is the most difficult sound to learn especially for students with specific language difficulties. The sound of the letter 'r' does not have an 'a before and after it.  Therefore, do not teach your students "ra says /ra/ as in rug," or whatever keywords you would like to use. Do not teach your students "ar says /ar/ as in rug," etc., either because that is not correct! 

Contact us for Teachers Literacy Training

to be continued...​

Prealphabetic writing.JPG

 Your decision today is your CHILD'S tomorrow!

Multisensory Reading Clinic Dyslexia Therapeutic Tutoring Service Learning Center 100% Success rate Learning to read, Ruth Tougas, Orton-Gillingham Tutor, Reading Specialist, Literacy Specialist, Montreal, Laval Quebec

Multisensory Reading Clinic Dyslexia Therapeutic Tutoring     www.multisensoryreadingclinic.com     Orton-Gillingham Instruction

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