Consonant-le  Syllable Six Syllable Type
Consonant-le Syllable Six Syllable Type

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Open Syllable Six Syllable Type Multisen
Open Syllable Six Syllable Type Multisen

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Closed Syllable Six Syllable Type Multis
Closed Syllable Six Syllable Type Multis

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Consonant-le  Syllable Six Syllable Type
Consonant-le Syllable Six Syllable Type

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Teaching and DIVIDING Multisyllabic words

  

How do we teach longer words?

The sounds of the English language are the foundations for learning to read and spell, we then connect the sounds to make words. Longer words are comprised of chunks of words or word parts called syllables. They are multisyllabic words.

Multisyllabic words mean the words have more than one syllable word and each syllable word must have a vowel or group of vowels that are separated by a consonant or consonants. No syllable words are without a vowel or group of vowels, but a syllable can only have a vowel without consonants. There are six syllables in the English language and multisyllabic words could have just one syllable type like a closed syllable or with different types of syllables combined together to make longer words.

Because multisyllabic words are word parts called syllables, the students must learn the syllable types with the correct sounds, along with strategies, rules, and techniques of the English language. They must not only learn but overlearn (fluency) the one-syllable words, followed by two-syllable words before they can learn to read the multisyllabic words. They would have a very weak foundation for each concept which would hinder them from reading longer words if they lack fluency and if the instruction is incorrect at each level.

 

How do we divide longer words?

As aforementioned, closed syllables are decodable and can be combined to make multisyllabic words, but the teacher must teach the students the correct instruction and strategies so that they can manage to read longer words without memorizing them. They must also reach the fluency level of one-syllable words including blends followed by two-syllable words, then three-syllable words, and so on.

 

All of these words including the one-syllable chunks of words are closed syllable words and this is how we divide them

basket = bas ket

fantastic = fan tas tic

badminton = bad min ton

combatant = com bat ant

ecstatic = ec stat ic

consistent = con sist ent

 

Again as mentioned, closed syllable words can also be combined with other syllables to make multisyllabic words; they are decodable too. As usual, the students must receive correct instruction, along with strategies so that they can manage to read long words without memorizing them. It is also very important to reach the fluency level of each six-syllable concept: one-syllable words followed by two-syllable words, then three-syllable words, and so on, or else they would have very weak decoding skills and would hinder them from reading longer words.

 

Do not add markings such as CVC, CCVCC, CCCVCCC at the bottom of each chunk of the word. Do not put a slash  /  in between each chunk of the word.

 

If the students have already reached the fluency level before these concepts, the markings only served as a distraction. If necessary, you can ask the students to write the word, and read it to you, typically it solves the problem; if not, ask the students to mark v-vowel because missing a vowel is the most students' typical error, particularly with r-controlled syllable. This also serves as a reminder to students that there are no English words without a vowel.

 

If the students struggle to read any multisyllabic word, the teacher must go back from the previous lesson because it indicates that the students have not reached the fluency level yet and their decoding skills are still very weak.

The following words are the combinations of six syllables and this is how we divide them.

 

flammule = flam mule – closed syllable, vowel-consonant-e syllable (silent-e)

introspect = in tro spect – closed syllable, open syllable, closed syllable

propaganda = prop a gan da – closed syllable, schwa open syllable, closed syllable, open syllable

lucrative = lu cra tive  - open syllable, open syllable, vowel-consonant-e syllable

accumulate = ac cu mu late – closed syllable, open syllable, open syllable, vowel-consonant-e syllable

delinquent = de lin quent – open syllable, closed syllable, closed syllable

administrate = ad min is trate – closed syllable, closed syllable, closed syllable, vowel-consonant-e syllable

embezzle = em bez zle – closed syllable, closed syllable, consonant-l-e syllable

example = ex am ple – closed syllable, closed syllable, consonant-l-e syllable

apostle = a pos tle – schwa open syllable, closed syllable, consonant-l-e syllable

compartment = com part ment – closed syllable, r-controlled syllable, closed syllable

transportation =trans por ta tion – closed syllable, r-controlled syllable, open syllable, vowel team syllable

hamburger = ham bur ger – closed syllable, r-controlled syllable, r-controlled syllable

canister = can is ter – closed syllable, closed syllable, r-controlled syllable

government = gov ern ment – closed syllable, r-controlled syllable, closed syllable

committee = com mit tee – closed syllable, closed syllable, vowel team syllable

appease = ap pease – closed syllable, vowel team syllable

exploitation = ex ploi ta tion – closed syllable, vowel team syllable, open syllable, vowel team syllable

flamboyant = flam boy ant – closed syllable, vowel team syllable, closed syllable

understood = un der stood – closed syllable, r-controlled syllable, vowel team syllable

toastmaster = toast mas ter – vowel team syllable, closed syllable, r-controlled syllable

Halloween = hal low een – closed syllable, vowel team syllable, vowel team syllable

congratulation = con grat u la tion – closed syllable, closed syllable, schwa open syllable, vowel team syllable

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